Na Lei Haku, from the mountain to the ocean, made with love by my Tūtū
This is a big part of why I run the trails, to find the most beautiful plants for my grandmother to make lei with. Yesterday was May 1 and in Hawaii that means Lei day. My grandmother is a master haku maker, she made these lei and I picked the plants she used.
The two silver/gray lei in the middle are made up of ʻahinahina o ke kai, a small beach heliotrope that grows in the sand near the sea. The top two lei and the bottom lei are comprised of the liko (young leaves) from the Ohiʻa tree which is commonly found in mountain top cloud forests. Hawaiian myth and legend describe the beginning of the Ohiʻa tree as a Hawaiian chief from ancient times named, Ohiʻa. Ohiʻa denied the love from the goddess Pele so she turned him into the twisted tree known today as Ohiʻa. The blossoms that grow on the Ohiʻa are called Lehua for the woman that Ohiʻa truly loved.

Na Lei Haku, from the mountain to the ocean, made with love by my Tūtū

This is a big part of why I run the trails, to find the most beautiful plants for my grandmother to make lei with. Yesterday was May 1 and in Hawaii that means Lei day. My grandmother is a master haku maker, she made these lei and I picked the plants she used.

The two silver/gray lei in the middle are made up of ʻahinahina o ke kai, a small beach heliotrope that grows in the sand near the sea. The top two lei and the bottom lei are comprised of the liko (young leaves) from the Ohiʻa tree which is commonly found in mountain top cloud forests. Hawaiian myth and legend describe the beginning of the Ohiʻa tree as a Hawaiian chief from ancient times named, Ohiʻa. Ohiʻa denied the love from the goddess Pele so she turned him into the twisted tree known today as Ohiʻa. The blossoms that grow on the Ohiʻa are called Lehua for the woman that Ohiʻa truly loved.